Soros, Gates back medtech’s move into a ‘social enterprise’; Aging anti-rejection drug earns fresh approval – Endpoints News

George Soros and Bill Gates are team­ing up to buy out a British di­ag­nos­tics com­pa­ny.

The pair and their foun­da­tions will spend about $41 mil­lion to trans­form Mo­log­ic in­to a “So­cial En­ter­prise” aimed at ex­pand­ing ac­cess to state-of-the-art med­ical tech­nol­o­gy, the com­pa­ny an­nounced Mon­day. Launched in 2003, Mo­log­ic comes from the fa­ther-and-son team of Mark and Paul Davis, the lat­ter of whom helped cre­ate one of the first at-home preg­nan­cy tests.

“Mo­log­ic’s tran­si­tion in­to a so­cial en­ter­prise is a de­lib­er­ate, log­i­cal and nat­ur­al step for a com­pa­ny fo­cused on de­liv­er­ing af­ford­able di­ag­nos­tics and biotech­nol­o­gy to places that have been left un­der­served by the re­lent­less pur­suit of prof­i­teer­ing,” Mark Davis, who al­so serves as CEO, said in a state­ment. — Max Gel­man

An­ti-re­jec­tion drug gets FDA OK for lung trans­plants

An an­ti-re­jec­tion drug pre­vi­ous­ly used to pre­vent or­gan re­jec­tion in pa­tients with liv­er, kid­ney and heart trans­plants has been ap­proved by the FDA for lung trans­plant pa­tients as well on Fri­day.

Pro­graf was ap­proved for use in com­bi­na­tion with oth­er im­muno­sup­pres­sant drugs. The ap­proval marks the first and on­ly for a drug to pre­vent re­jec­tion of a lung trans­plant.

Ap­proval was grant­ed based on a non-in­ter­ven­tion­al, fit-for-pur­pose study us­ing re­al-world da­ta. Da­ta were col­lect­ed on all US lung trans­plants, and da­ta from ran­dom­ized con­trolled tri­als of Pro­graf in oth­er set­tings pro­vid­ed con­fir­ma­to­ry ev­i­dence, the FDA said.

“A dra­mat­ic im­prove­ment in out­comes was ob­served among lung trans­plant pa­tients re­ceiv­ing Pro­graf as part of their im­muno­sup­pres­sion med­ica­tions com­pared to the well-doc­u­ment­ed nat­ur­al his­to­ry of a trans­plant­ed drug with no or min­i­mal im­muno­sup­pres­sive ther­a­py,” the press re­lease from the FDA said.  — Josh Sul­li­van

As­traZeneca pneu­mo­nia can­di­date tar­get­ed in li­cens­ing deal

Aridis Phar­ma­ceu­ti­cals will ex­clu­sive­ly li­cense As­traZeneca’s late-stage pneu­mo­nia an­ti­body can­di­date su­vra­tox­um­ab.

Su­vra­tox­um­ab, which re­cent­ly fin­ished a Phase II tri­al, will com­ple­ment Aridis’ own Phase III pneu­mo­nia pro­gram for AR-301. Both can­di­dates tar­get the S. au­reus strain.

As part of the deal, As­traZeneca will be­come a share­hold­er in Aridis and will re­tain fu­ture “first-to-ne­go­ti­ate” rights for li­cens­ing the pro­gram.

In that Phase II test, su­vra­tox­um­ab re­duced the rel­a­tive risk of pneu­mo­nia by 32% in 196 pa­tients with a 47% re­duc­tion in the over-65 pop­u­la­tion. The drug was al­so as­so­ci­at­ed with a sub­stan­tial re­duc­tion in du­ra­tion of care need­ed at the ICU and hos­pi­tal. — Kyle Blanken­ship

Ra­tio­nal de­sign for pro­tein degra­da­tion? Aus­tri­an deep learn­ing start­up takes a stab

For all the promis­es of PRO­TACs and mol­e­c­u­lar glues as a class, there re­mains lots of room for im­prove­ment on how in­di­vid­ual pro­tein de­graders are dis­cov­ered.

Christo­pher Trum­mer

That’s ac­cord­ing to Christo­pher Trum­mer, a for­mer bioin­for­mat­ics con­sul­tant who no­ticed, while do­ing con­tract re­search for a va­ri­ety of bio­phar­ma com­pa­nies, that there was re­al­ly no ra­tio­nal ap­proach to de­sign­ing mol­e­cules that can grab tar­gets and tag them for dis­pos­al. Iden­ti­fy­ing the right ones was al­ways a tri­al and er­ror af­fair.

“Typ­i­cal­ly if you do some brute force meth­ods, high through­put screen­ing — even if you part­ner with [what are con­sid­ered] the cheap­est CROs, right — you would end up in at least half a mil­lion or a mil­lion for screen­ing, in the PRO­TAC area, maybe 2,000, 3,000 com­pounds, some­thing like that,” he said. “So it is very very cost­ly.”

To­geth­er with his friend Jakob Ho­hen­berg­er, who has a back­ground in tech, Trum­mer be­gan ex­plor­ing a so­lu­tion steeped in deep learn­ing. The re­sult was Celeris Ther­a­peu­tics, whose Celeris One soft­ware promis­es to pre­dict pro­tein-pro­tein in­ter­ac­tions and dock­ing specif­i­cal­ly for ap­pli­ca­tions in tar­get­ed pro­tein in­ter­ac­tions.

Jakob Ho­hen­berg­er

It was enough to draw in­quiries from Big Phar­ma and biotech com­pa­nies, Trum­mer said, one of which has al­ready agreed to a part­ner­ship.

The team of 15 is cur­rent­ly based in Aus­tria. While Celeris plans to keep a pres­ence here — and grow even big­ger by build­ing a wet lab lat­er this year — Trum­mer, the CEO, plans to move to Sil­i­con Val­ley soon to be clos­er to in­vestors as well as sci­en­tists and po­ten­tial part­ners.

True to its Eu­ro­pean roots, though, Celeris has kept its fund­ing mod­est. Af­ter APEX Med­ical brought their pre-seed fund­ing to €1.6 mil­lion ($1.89 mil­lion), the biotech is tar­get­ing €5 mil­lion for the seed round.

“We gen­uine­ly be­lieve that these ma­chine learn­ing based sim­u­la­tions will stream­line the way ear­ly stage drug de­vel­op­ment is per­formed and even­tu­al­ly will ben­e­fit all over the world,” Gor­don Eu­ller, gen­er­al part­ner at APEX, wrote in an email.

The goal, ul­ti­mate­ly, is to op­er­ate like the cash-rich AI play­er Ex­sci­en­tia, which is lend­ing its tech­nol­o­gy to clients but al­so pur­su­ing in-house dis­cov­ery and de­vel­op­ment. — Am­ber Tong

Opi­oid al­ter­na­tive starts PhII tri­al in bunionec­to­my and ab­domino­plas­ty surgery

Ver­tex has kicked off a Phase II proof-of-con­cept study in acute pain af­ter bunionec­to­my surgery, the com­pa­ny an­nounced Mon­day. It will start a Phase II study of pain fol­low­ing ab­domino­plas­ty surgery in the com­ing weeks.

Car­men Boz­ic

The ran­dom­ized, dou­ble-blind­ed, place­bo-con­trolled stud­ies will eval­u­ate its se­lec­tive NaV1.8 in­hibitor VX-548, and in­clude a hy­drocodone bitar­trate/ac­eta­minophen ref­er­ence arm. The small mol­e­cule has shown to re­duce neu­ro­path­ic pain and mus­cu­loskele­tal pain in pre­vi­ous clin­i­cal tri­als. If Ver­tex hits on VX-548, it could pro­vide a po­tent, non-ad­dic­tive al­ter­na­tive to opi­oids.

“NaV1.8 is a ge­net­i­cal­ly and phar­ma­co­log­i­cal­ly val­i­dat­ed tar­get and we are ex­cit­ed about the po­ten­tial for VX-548 as a new class of ef­fec­tive pain treat­ments with­out the lim­i­ta­tions of cur­rent ther­a­pies, in­clud­ing the ad­dic­tive po­ten­tial of opi­oids,” EVP Car­men Boz­ic said in a press re­lease.

Re­sults from the study are ex­pect­ed by Q1 of 2022. — Josh Sul­li­van

French biotech PEP-Ther­a­py ex­pands Se­ries A round

A few months af­ter clos­ing its $3.4 mil­lion Se­ries A round, Paris-based PEP-Ther­a­py has in­vestors reach­ing a lit­tle deep­er in­to their wal­lets.

PEP-Ther­a­py has reeled in an­oth­er $3 mil­lion in a Se­ries A ex­pan­sion, bring­ing its to­tal haul to $6.4 mil­lion. The com­pa­ny’s work­ing on what it calls Cell Pen­e­trat­ing & In­ter­fer­ing Pep­tide (CP&IP) tech­nol­o­gy, de­signed to pen­e­trate cells and specif­i­cal­ly block rel­e­vant in­tra­cel­lu­lar pro­tein-pro­tein in­ter­ac­tions. Its lead can­di­date PEP-010 is cur­rent­ly in a Phase Ia/b tri­al for ad­vanced sol­id tu­mors.

“We are de­light­ed to have com­plet­ed this fi­nanc­ing round via an at­trac­tive bal­ance of di­lu­tive and non-di­lu­tive funds from new high qual­i­ty and di­ver­si­fied in­vestors who will bring ex­per­tise and new in­sights to sup­port our de­vel­op­ment,” CEO An­toine Pre­stat said in a state­ment. — Nicole De­Feud­is 

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